Zero Motor­cy­cles has announced a new all-elec­tric motor­cy­cle with abun­dant range, spine-bend­ing per­for­mance, and a rid­ing expe­ri­ence the Cal­i­for­nia com­pa­ny likened to rid­ing in a Gulf­stream jet.

The new motor­cy­cle, called the SR/S, is an evo­lu­tion of sorts of the flag­ship bike Zero unveiled last year, the SR/F. It uses the same elec­tric motor and bat­tery as the SR/F, and there­fore offers basi­cal­ly the same specs. The SR/S can reach a top speed of 124 miles per hour, has a range of up to 200 miles (when using the option­al range-extend­ing bat­tery “tank”), and has 110 horse­pow­er at the flick of the wrist. It also can charge at up to 12kW with the option­al rapid-charg­ing pack­age, allow­ing the bat­tery to get from 0 to 95 per­cent in about an hour.

The SR/S fea­tures the SR/F’s pow­er­train in a more aero­dy­nam­ic pack­age

The SR/S also shares the SR/F’s dig­i­tal DNA. There’s a big dig­i­tal screen, a com­pan­ion smart­phone app, and a lev­el of con­nec­tiv­i­ty that allows for over-the-air updates and real-time rid­ing sta­tis­tics. Con­sid­er­ing all the sim­i­lar­i­ties, it should be no sur­prise that the SR/S will cost about the same when it goes on sale in March, as it starts at $19,995.

The big dif­fer­ence between the two motor­cy­cles is in the SR/S’s styling. It’s Zero’s first motor­cy­cle with a full fair­ing, mean­ing it has a more com­plete set of body pan­els than the more “naked” bikes the com­pa­ny has been known for.

Relat­ed

Zero’s new elec­tric motor­cy­cle jus­ti­fies the com­par­isons to Tes­la

This dra­mat­i­cal­ly alters the look of the bike, but Zero says it also put a lot of effort into mod­el­ing that body work using com­pu­ta­tion­al flu­id dynam­ics to make it a much more aero­dy­nam­ic motor­cy­cle. In return, rid­ers who tuck into the SR/S’s “cock­pit” should see up to a 13 per­cent gain in range — mean­ing you can the­o­ret­i­cal­ly squeeze an extra 26 miles out of the 200-mile ver­sion of the bike.

That said, Abe Aske­nazi, Zero’s chief tech­nol­o­gy offi­cer, said the goal with the SR/S was “not to extract the most range,” because oth­er­wise the com­pa­ny would have end­ed up “with a bub­ble bike” that’s “gonna look weird.” Instead, Zero CEO Sam Paschel said the com­pa­ny set out to cre­ate a motor­cy­cle with a strik­ing, sophis­ti­cat­ed, and eas­i­ly rec­og­niz­able pro­file.

Pho­to by Sean O’Kane / The Verge Pho­to by Sean O’Kane / The Verge Pho­to by Sean O’Kane / The Verge

It seems fair to say that Zero suc­ceed­ed at that goal. It’s def­i­nite­ly rock­ing a more cul­ti­vat­ed vibe than the company’s oth­er bikes, and to my eyes, it looks like no oth­er elec­tric motor­cy­cle on the road.

To be clear, I mean that lit­er­al­ly. While seem­ing­ly dozens of wild-look­ing elec­tric motor­cy­cles have been announced over the last few years, very few of them are actu­al­ly avail­able for pur­chase, and basi­cal­ly none of them come from a com­pa­ny with a rep­u­ta­tion like Zero’s. (“A lot of that stuff is vapor­ware,” Paschel jabbed Wednes­day.) Zero start­ed mak­ing elec­tric motor­cy­cles in 2006, and has spent the last 14 years method­i­cal­ly improv­ing the tech­nol­o­gy and win­ning over more and more deep-pock­et­ed cus­tomers.

Zero says the SR/S offers an “ele­vat­ed” and “much more serene” expe­ri­ence

The SR/S is dif­fer­en­ti­at­ed from the SR/F in its rid­ing posi­tion and com­fort lev­el, too. Zero says slight­ly high­er han­dle­bars and low­er foot pegs allow rid­ers to relax into a more upright stance than on most of its oth­er bikes. (The seat is also larg­er.) On top of all of this, Zero says the sus­pen­sion has been tuned to pro­vide a smoother, more com­fort­able ride.

Com­bined with the SR/S’s looks, this is all sup­posed to cre­ate an “ele­vat­ed, more sophis­ti­cat­ed, and much more serene” rid­ing expe­ri­ence, Paschel said. Hence the Gulf­stream metaphor.

“We use the air­craft and aero­space metaphors a lot,” Paschel said. “The exist­ing motor­cy­cles in our line would be a more raw and vis­cer­al rid­ing expe­ri­ence that’s tuned for real­ly high per­for­mance … we think about it like pilot­ing a fight­er plane. By con­trast, what you’re going to see in the SR/S is some­thing that’s much more like a pri­vate jet, a Gulf­stream.”

The SR/S also comes in sil­ver. Image: Zero Motor­cy­cles

That’s per­haps a stretch, and for a com­pa­ny that’s laser-focused on sell­ing zero-emis­sion vehi­cles, a pri­vate jet may not be the best par­al­lel to draw. But the point is tak­en. You could eas­i­ly argue that Zero owns the nascent elec­tric motor­cy­cle mar­ket, as the only rec­og­niz­able com­pe­ti­tion is Harley-Davidson’s absurd­ly expen­sive $30,000 LiveWire.

With the SR/S (and the SR/F), Zero is clear­ly try­ing to take things fur­ther. The com­pa­ny wants to estab­lish itself as a pre­mi­um brand that tran­scends its elec­tric pow­er­train tech­nol­o­gy. Con­sid­er­ing the amount of atten­tion the SR/S received before today’s unveil­ing, Zero seems to be accom­plish­ing that, too. In the week lead­ing up to the announce­ment, the SR/S all but ful­ly leaked, which Paschel said is a “sig­nal that the indus­try is tak­ing [elec­tric motor­cy­cles] more seri­ous­ly.”

“Each time we launch one of these bikes,” Paschel said, “we’re push­ing not just our brand for­ward, but we’re push­ing the cat­e­go­ry for­ward, and we’re push­ing the entire indus­try on the motor­cy­cle side for­ward into the future of elec­tric.”

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Pho­tog­ra­phy by Sean O’Kane / The Verge

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